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Kevin and Tam Ross Leatherby Libraries Undergraduate Research Prize  

Last Updated: Jul 25, 2014 URL: http://chapman.libguides.com/researchprize Print Guide RSS Updates

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About the Prize

Congratulations to Our 2014 Winners!

  • History and Spanish double major Emily Neis ’14, first place, for “Conflicting Definitions of Relief: Life in Refugee Camps after the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906.”

  • Psychology major Kiersten Kelly ’14, second place, for “Effects of Cognitive Interventions on the Cognition of Patients Diagnosed with Dementia.”

  • History major Kenneth Schneider ’14, third place, for “The Descent Unseen: Greece’s Unappreciated Place in British Political History.”

  • History major Jonathan Wooldridge ’14, honorable mention for “Signs of Promise: American Sign Language at Gallaudet University during the 19th Century.”

 

2014 Winners

2014 First Place         Emily Neis

Major                           History/Spanish

Paper                           Conflicting Definitions of Relief: Life in Refugee Camps after the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906

Supporting Faculty    Dr. Robert A. Slayton

Paper Description
Ms. Neis uses the April 18, 1906, earthquake in San Francisco as a starting point for her examination of the history of U.S. relief efforts. She concludes that, while the progressive relief efforts employed after the quake influenced the public’s understanding of relief, little has changed in terms of designating the poor as either “deserving” or “undeserving.”

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Neis started her research by consulting with librarian Rand Boyd. This consultation led her to several useful points of access within the Leatherby Libraries, including Discover!, the California Digital Newspapers Collection, interlibrary loan, and ProQuest Theses & Dissertations Full-Text. Ms. Neis also used the collections of other university libraries such as UC Berkeley, Notre Dame, and Harvard, using the finding aid skills that she learned from Rand Boyd. She intends to build upon her knowledge of historiography as she pursues her degree in library science.


2014 Second Place    
Kiersten Kelly

Major                           Psychology

Paper                           Effects of Cognitive Interventions on the Cognition of Patients Diagnosed With Dementia

Supporting Faculty    Dr. Steven Schandler

Paper Description
Ms. Kelly’s goal for this literature review was to find support for her hypothesis that patients diagnosed with dementia would develop fewer cognitive deficits if they participated in a program of cognitive intervention. Based upon her research, she concluded that, although nine of the twenty articles did support the hypothesis, the presence of mixed results, showing both support and opposition, and contradictory results, exhibiting direct refutation, called for additional research.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library|
Ms. Kelly used many of the library’s databases to find the twenty articles that appeared in her literature review: Academic OneFile, CINAHL, PubMed, and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health are a sampling. In addition, she designed her search strategies to include primary and secondary sources, peer reviewed articles, and empirical studies, which she further narrowed down to articles published within the past five years. The skills that Ms. Kelly honed during the production of her senior thesis will be useful as she continues to conduct research in the future.  


2014 Third Place       
Kenneth Schneider

Major                           History

Paper                           The Descent Unseen: Greece’s Unappreciated Place in British Political History

Supporting Faculty    Dr. Robert A. Slayton

Paper Description
Mr. Schneider posits that the fall of the British Empire relied less on the loss of India and Egypt than on the civil unrest that was building in Greece. His project examines the six-month period following the resignation of Winston Churchill and how this period would define Britain’s future as a political superpower.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Mr. Schneider met with librarian Rand Boyd to start the research process. Mr. Boyd provided suggestions for accessing primary sources to support the research, which included helping Mr. Schneider gain a trial membership to the Winston Churchill archive in Britain as well as using databases within the library such as JSTOR and ProQuest. Mr. Schneider also discovered the Research and Subject Guides that helped him access even more credible sources. In the end, Mr. Schneider credits the meetings with Rand Boyd for his new understanding of the difference between conclusions reached through secondary sources and conclusions reached through the examination of primary sources.


2014 Honorable Mention    
Jonathan Wooldridge

Major                                     History

Paper                                     Signs of Promise: American Sign Language at Gallaudet University during the 19th Century

Supporting Faculty               Dr. Robert A. Slayton

Paper Description
Mr. Wooldridge’s project focuses on the discourse surrounding deaf education in the 19th century, specifically on the educational techniques employed at Gallaudet University. He suggests that the use of both sign language and speech education, rather than speech-exclusive education, fought against the social stigma of disability so pervasive in deaf education of the time.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Mr. Wooldridge credits much of his success with this project to the instruction he received from Rand Boyd, the subject librarian for history. Within the Leatherby Libraries, Mr.  Wooldridge used the Research and Subject Guide for History as a starting point, which led to the databases from EBSCOhost, JSTOR, and ProQuest. He continued his research in the Gallaudet University archives, making use of finding aids to locate primary sources. After the completion of his research, Mr. Wooldridge is confident that his ability to seek and find sources, evaluate material, and synthesize resources are skills that will help him in the discipline of history.

 

Past Winners

2013

2013 First Place

Conny Fasshauer

Major

English Lit./Philosophy

Paper

The Humanoid Demon: Public Catharsis in “The Monk”, “Wuthering Heights”, and “Beloved

Supporting Faculty

Dr. Lynda Hall, Department of English


Paper Description
Ms. Fasshauer examines the archetypal villain she refers to as the humanoid demon in works that reflect social tensions during periods of drastic change, specifically in The Monk, Wuthering Heights, and Beloved. The humanoid demon is traced across time and geographic space, and Ms. Fasshauer concludes that authors and readers are drawn to this literary figure as a means of catharsis. 

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Fasshauer built upon the skills that she used as a prior Undergraduate Research Prize winner. She made use of reference conferences with librarian Rand Boyd, with an emphasis on how to select and structure words and phrases for searching. She used the Cambridge Companion series as well as the Discover search and physical books from the Leatherby Libraries and interlibrary loan. Ms. Fasshauer feels more confident going into her graduate studies with the skills that she learned during this process.


2013 Second Place

Priya Shah

Major

History/Spanish

Paper

Language, Discipline, and Power: The Extirpation of Idolatry in Colonial Peru and Indigenous Resistance

Supporting Faculty

Dr. Lee Estes, Department of History


Paper Description
Ms. Shah’s work is a comparative study of the Inquisition and the Extirpation of Idolatry in Colonial Peru. Using careful language analysis of Extirpation trial records, native chronicles, and letters to the King of Spain, Shah posits that the indigenous population was able to preserve much of their own power by subverting their oppressors through linguistic pluralism.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Shah made good use of the resources in the library. She started with an individual reference conference with librarian Rand Boyd, who introduced her to ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, JSTOR, and Discover. Accessing primary and secondary sources through both the library and interlibrary loan gave Ms. Shah the necessary background to deepen her research, and with grant funds, she was able to travel to Lima, Peru, to continue her studies, complete with instructions from Rand Boyd on how to conduct archival research and how to document her findings. Ms. Shah is grateful for the support of the library, from helpful librarians to interlibrary loan to providing a welcoming study space.


2013 Third Place

Phoebe Gildea

Major

Vocal Performance/Music

Paper

Death, Resurrection, and the Power of Music

Supporting Faculty

Dr. Jessica Sternfeld, College of Performing Arts; Dr. Carmichael Peters, Department of Honors; and Dr. Julye Bidmead, Department of Religious Studies


Paper Description
Ms. Gildea examines the Orpheus myth in operas by Peri, Monteverdi, Rossi, and Gluck. She postulates that each of these operas demonstrates the Renaissance practice of using this myth as a symbol of Christ’s resurrection, yet each composer changes the Orpheus mythology to reflect the influence of the times, specifically in the use of pastoral drama and its reliance on happy endings.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Gildea utilized many resources within the library, beginning with books that detailed the Orpheus myth. She added to her knowledge by meeting with librarian Scott Stone, who helped her to limit her searches within defined sources such as RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, JSTOR, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. Ms. Gildea used scores, DVDs, books, and databases to research her theory of the Orpheus myth as an evolving concept that is still present in today’s popular culture.


2012


2012 First Place Hayden Dingman
Major History/Film
Paper “Tin Soldiers and Nixon Coming”: Musical Framing and the Kent State Shootings
Supporting Faculty    Dr. Lee Estes, Department of History


Paper Description

Mr. Dingman’s paper analyzed the music that arose from the Kent State Shootings, revealing a new way of looking at the event, a cultural framing of vastly greater importance to the 1970s youth than heretofore recognized. The tragedy at Kent State became defined by the music around it more than the event itself.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Mr. Dingman used the Leatherby Libraries as well as Orange Public Library for his basic research. As his research developed he turned more to online sources and eventually traveling to Kent State and working in their extensive holdings on the event in their Special Collections department.


2012 Second Place Clara Chung
Major Vocal Performance/Music
Paper The Distinctive character of Premonstratensian Chant
Supporting Faculty    Dr. Amy Graziano

Paper Description
Ms. Chung’s study first places music, specifically Gregorian chant, in its proper religious context within the Catholic Church services and daily lives of the members of its many varied orders.  Then the differing chants of the Premonstratensian (AKA Norbertines) order are examined as a derivative from the original Gregorian chants.  After comparing the two types of chant, Chung is able to begin to define the distinct Norbertine characteristics through examination of “types of intervals and melodic patterns, differences in notation, and more decorated melodies for feasts of special importance to the Norbertines.”

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Chung exhaustively searched various music databases, such as RILM, Oxford Music Online, and Music Index, which she had learned how to use after instruction sessions with the Music Librarian (that’s me!).  After gaining a grasp of the topic’s background through this secondary literature, Clara turned to using WorldCat and Interlibrary Loan to actually examine Norbertine chant books.  The primary resources that Clara obtained through ILL spurred her on to discover the Center for Norbertine Studies in De Pere, Wisconsin, which she visited for one week thanks to a research grant from the Chapman Office of Undergraduate Research.  While at the Center, Clara was helped by the eager librarians, treated as a visiting scholar, and most importantly, was able to examine many different original sources of Norbertine chant.


2012 Third Place Conny Fasshauer
Major English Lit./Philosophy
Paper Removing the Rose Colored Glasses: Restoring Scholarly Value to Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë’s Works against Biographical Prejudice.
Supporting Faculty Dr. Lynda Hall


Paper Description

Ms. Fasshauer’s paper discusses the myths and popular notions of the Bronte sister’s, how biographers have approached these myths, and the relation to the Bronte’s sister’s own writings of fiction and poetry. Conny stated “…these sisters were extremely influential both as specifically women writers and as Victorian novelists overall, reemphasizing the importance of the novels over the myths surrounding the authors’ lives”.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Fasshauer used a variety of library materials in writing her paper. These included primary texts by Charlotte, Anne, and Emily Bronte; video biographies; reference materials such as the Nineteenth Century Literature Criticism collection, and the MLA International Bibliography database. After a wealth of resources had been gathered, Conny then spent time evaluating these sources to determine their appropriateness for her paper, which is an important part of the research process. Conny used multiple libraries to assist her with research and stated “I now have a greater familiarity with the language of research as well as the ability to judge the quality of a source. Thanks to the help of many librarians who were willing to guide me at any point in the process, my project was not only personally rewarding, but academically successful”.


2011

2011 First Place Kirsten Moore
Major History & Screenwriting
Paper Medical Manipulation: Public Health as a Political Tool in the 1918-19 Influenza Epidemic in San Francisco
Course History 498A: Integrated Senior Seminar: US History
Supporting Faculty    Dr. Robert Slayton & Dr. Alexander Bay, Department of History


Paper Description

Ms. Moore's paper examines how "the local government in San Francisco capitalized" on the lack of medical knowledge during the 1918-1919 global influenza epidemic "to portray the city as the most healthy, vigorous, and quintessentially American city in the nation." Ms. Moore states that the city's mayor James Rolph, Jr. "regulated San Francisco as a hospital." She reveals how local government used a public health campaign to Americanize the city's immigrants. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on the North Beach Italian community, the Irish Catholic community, and the largely ignored Chinese community as she examines the intersection of politics, history, and medicine.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Moore examined print and electronic resources at the Leatherby Libraries and various California archives and libraries while conducting her research. The array of materials she used included newspapers in English, Italian, and Chinese; hospital records; public health and death reports; books; oral histories; photographs; and more. She searched for articles for the years 1918-1919 using the Los Angeles Times historical database through the Leatherby Libraries, as well as the historical San Francisco Chronicle through the San Francisco Public Library. JSTOR provided her with scholarly journal articles. Through instruction she received at Leatherby Libraries, Ms. Moore learned how to evaluate sources and narrow her search to filter out irrelevant material. She comments that she evaluated her sources "as products of their time, taking into account political motivations when reading them." Beyond the Leatherby Libraries, Ms. Moore researched and received assistance by librarians and archivists at the San Francisco History Center, the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library, the San Francisco History Center, and the California Historical Society. Ms. Moore states, "This experience has given me a head start as a future historian and I hope to continue with similar pursuits later on."


2011 Second Place Gary Girod
Major French & History
Paper "We Were Carrying on a Strike When We Ought to Have Been Making a Revolution": The Rise of Marxist Leaders in Glasgow During WWI and the Illusion of a Communist Worker's Republic in Scotland
Course History 498B: Integrated Senior Seminar: European History
Supporting Faculty    Dr. Lee Estes, Department of History


Paper Description

Mr. Girod argues in his paper that the existence of Glasgow Marxist agitators during World War I cannot be characterized as a revolutionary or class movement. Although Marxists were the only ones openly disagreeing with the government during this time period and "they became the leaders of various social movements," they ultimately "never led truly Marxist or socialist movements as the average Glaswegian was patriotic, highly religious,…and generally capitalistic." Mr. Girod believes that the "near-revolution" in Glasgow, as portrayed in the memoirs of Marxist leaders and embraced by most earlier historians is a myth. He states that "the loyalty given by the workers to the Marxists only lasted until they had achieved a social victory."

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Mr. Girod started his research by gathering scholarly journal articles through JSTOR and Academic Search Premier. He also utilized interlibrary loan services to obtain books related to his topic. To locate additional sources, Mr. Girod scanned references and read book reviews. These techniques led him to relevant primary sources. During his time at Chapman, Mr. Girod attended numerous research instruction sessions at the library, including a workshop specific to citing using the Chicago Manual of Style. He also received assistance from Archives and Cataloging Librarian Rand Boyd. He conducted research outside of the United States in London and Edinburgh, as well as a two week stint combing through various archives in Glasgow. While researching in Glasgow, he discovered socialist manifestos and pamphlets, newspapers, minutes of the Scottish Trades Union Council, and other materials. In conclusion, he states, "Through this experience I feel I have the expertise in the use of library and archival research and was even able to apply my knowledge in a non-English setting for a separate project."


2011 Third Place Elizabeth Ficken
Major History
Paper "Save One Life, Save the World Entire": Nicholas Winton, Lisolette Weil, and the 1939 Prague Rescue Operation
Course History 498B: Integrated Senior Seminar: European History
Supporting Faculty    Dr. Lee Estes, Department of History


Paper Description

Ms. Ficken writes, "In my paper, I examine the rescue efforts made to save Jewish children from Germany and German occupied territory during the Second World War." Throughout her paper, Ms. Ficken compares and contrasts the experience of 10,000 rescued children from Central Europe from December 1938 to August 1939 with the experience of 669 children in Czechoslovakia saved by Nicholas Winton, a young English businessman. She states her main argument is "that Winton's personalized placement of the children he rescued enabled them to become acclimated more rapidly and ensured that they were properly cared and provided for." This, Ms. Ficken concludes, was more successful than the slower acclimation experienced by the 10,000 children who were placed less personally by organizations.

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Ms. Ficken used diverse sources for her research, including diaries, letters, old newspaper clippings, pamphlets, scholarly articles, and oral testimonies collected by the Anti-Defamation League of Orange County. She worked extensively with the collections in the Sala and Aron Samueli Holocaust Memorial Library within Leatherby Libraries, including conducting research "on a large steamer trunk full of primary documents" that was donated to the library by the family of a Holocaust survivor. She estimates logging 225 hours of research in the Leatherby Libraries. Early on, Archives and Cataloging Librarian Rand Boyd instructed Ms. Ficken on archiving and cataloging her research. She also received assistance from Jessica Mylymuk and Ashley Bloomfield of the Holocaust Memorial Library and librarians Annie Knight, Stacy Russo, Claudia Horn, and Douglas Dechow. In her winning essay, Ms. Ficken comments on the importance of the physical library, including computers, study rooms, and the "clean, quite" spaces where she read and worked. She concludes, "I will use the knowledge given me by the Leatherby Libraries as I continue my studies now and in the future." 


2011 Honorable Mention Matthew Hacholski
Major History
Paper "A New and Unwholesome Principle": American and British Influence on the Turco-Greek Exchange Convention of January 30, 1923
Course History 498B: Integrated Senior Seminar: European History
Supporting Faculty    Dr. Lee Estes, Department of History


Paper Description

Mr. Hacholski examines the Lausanne Exchange Convention of 1923 after the Greco-Turk War that "implemented the first internationally condoned compulsory population exchange." He explains that the exchange "formalized the transfer of approximately 1.5 million Greeks and 400,000 Turks and in the process created the modern-day states of Turkey and Greece." Mr. Hacholski's paper investigates "the influence Great Britain and the United States exercised over this concept during the Lausanne Conference." He ultimately reveals "a previously unacknowledged element of American influence over the population exchange."

Essay on the Research Process and Use of the Library
Mr. Hacholski writes that the "library instruction sessions" he attended were the "first stepping stone" in his research process. He recalls learning how to distinguish between primary and second sources, how to "evaluate the legitimacy of a website," and how to properly cite his sources. He believes learning how to use the WorldCat database was most important for his research, since this allowed him to search libraries throughout the country for specific sources. He physically visited the libraries of Cal State Fullerton, Santiago Canyon College, UCI, and UCLA after discovering holdings at these libraries through WorldCat. He sought assistance from various librarians at the reference desk when he encountered difficulties. In particular, Reference Librarian David Goto assisted him in accessing "online documents outsides of the United States." Mr. Hacholski also heavily used interlibrary loan services. He credits the "collective help" he received from Maria Yanez, Coordinator of Interlibrary Loan, Susan Djokic, Library Assistant, and Kyle Banick, a student worker in the Interlibrary Loan Department, as being "vital to the creation" of his thesis. He describes the Leatherby Libraries as a "place of refuge" where he was able to retreat and "research in peace."

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